Book Review: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

The fourth book of “The Chronicles of Narnia” is entitled “Prince Caspian.” In this book, C. S. Lewis builds on the story of the four youngsters who played such an important role in “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe,” namely: Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. The four children are pulled out of our world and sent to Narnia by the power of a magical horn that a certain Prince Caspian blows in desperation to summon aid.

The children arrive on the scene in Narnia literally thousands of years after they originally reigned in “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe.” The castle that was the seat of their power is now a ruin. The landscape has altered: rivers are not where they are expected to be. The magical powers of the land are weakened: forests lie dormant, and many of the animals of that world no longer speak. It is, indeed, a dark time.

With the help of a dwarf guide they set out to render assistance to Prince Caspian. Prince Caspian, the rightful ruler of Narnia, has been usurped by his uncle Miraz, the ruthless Telmarine King who seeks Caspian’s death. Caspian, once in Miraz’s care, has fled the Telmarine castle and taken up with those few of the old Narnians—the talking animals, the wood spirits, and what-have-you—who are willing to fight for their old land and for this new promising king who is not afraid of them and will cherish their magical ways. As a result, the armies of King Miraz and the armies of King Caspian are destined to clash at Aslan’s How, the location where the great Lion, Aslan, came back from the dead in “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.”

Aslan, of course, does make an appearance in the book. First, he is seen by Lucy, but not the others; however, shortly, beginning with Edmund, the others start to see him. I won’t dwell anymore on the plot elements of the book; if you are further interested, you should read it. Like the other Narnia books, it is an excellent fantasy novel that espouses much of the Christian ethics that has so influenced so much of the world. But, like the others, I must emphasize it is a children’s book. Although it was not as tiresome as some of the others, I still had to struggle to finish it—but that’s because I’m an adult, I think. I do believe young children would enjoy it immensely.

Overall, I would give this book four stars out of five for a young children audience, but only two and half or so for an adult audience. The writing style is just too simplistic and quick. I just never felt like I could quite immerse myself in the world created or anything like that.

This review was originally posted on Shelfari on 12/30/12.

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About atoasttodragons

The author, Matthew D. Ryan, lives in northern New York on the shores of Lake Champlain, one of the largest lakes in the continental United States, famous for the Battle of Plattsburgh and the ever-elusive Lake Champlain Monster, a beastie more commonly referred to as Champy. Matthew has studied philosophy, mathematics, and computer science in the academic world. He has earned a black belt in martial arts.

3 responses to “Book Review: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian”

  1. Sophie E Tallis says :

    Great book, one of my favourites as a child. Now, in the mists of time and the chaotic bird’s nest that is my brain, I know you very kindly nominated me for something…firstly, thank you again kind sir, secondly, I have nominated you for the Very Inspiring Blogger Award!! You have some really great articles here and deserve to get this, congratulations honey! 😀
    http://sophieetallis.wordpress.com/2013/01/24/very-inspiring-again/

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