Tag Archive | bookstore

Do We Have Too Many Books?

This may seem like an odd view coming from a fantasy author like myself. And I’m not even sure if I emphatically believe it. It is just an odd thought that occurred to me as I was puttering around my house the other day. We have shelves and shelves of books around the place, so many that I wouldn’t even want to hazard a guess at a precise number. More than one hundred, less than ten thousand. Books on all sorts of different subjects. We have books on psychiatry, psychology, biology, and physics. We have fantasy books, science fiction books, historical books and more. And that is just this one house. Then, I imagine all the millions of similar households throughout the United States that must, no doubt, be similarly equipped. The number of books out there is staggering. And that doesn’t even include the libraries, colleges, bookstores and everything else. And then there are the ebooks spreading throughout the Internet like a literary plague.

 

My question is: are all these books necessary? If I’m honest–although as an author, this answer is not to my liking–I think the answer is no. We are suffering from a deluge of information. We have more books than we know what to do with. To be sure, thanks to the advent of the Internet and the rising surge of ebooks, there is a lot of garbage out there. But what about dated books? A physics book from the 1940’s? Or biology? Those two fields have advanced by leaps and bounds. Yet, how many old text books with dated information are circulating throughout the globe? They served a purpose once, but now… do we really need them, when modern textbooks contain better theories and more complete explanations? I’m not a huge environmentalist–I think the environment is a legitimate concern, but I protest the near religious fervor some of its advocates embrace–but every physical textbook cost a tree its life. It is clear to me, that we don’t need a lot of the old scientific books we have… perhaps a few copies in libraries to guarantee that they can be referenced, but that’s about it. Why not recycle the old textbooks to write the new? (Or is somebody already doing that?)

 

As a fantasy writer my primary concern is not science, but entertainment. We have the literary classics like Shakespeare and Hemingway, but there are a plethora of others who don’t quite measure up to such high standards. During my high school years I probably read one hundred fantasy books all by myself. I have no inclination to go back and read them again, but that doesn’t mean my nieces or nephews might not enjoy them. They were, after all, enjoyable stories. But with few exceptions (like the Lord of the Rings), my nieces and nephews probably won’t be reading the same stories I read. Every new generation produces its own wave of tales for the generation following. But at this point in history, do we really need to produce more stories? Can’t we use the ones that have already been written? Do the old stories become “bad” or “unworthy” because someone has written something similar more recently? I’m an author and I like telling stories and I like adding new twists and ideas in the stories I tell. But I know that a lot has come before me… so much, perhaps, I am no longer needed. That does not bode well for me. I want to write and make a living at it. But, seriously, how many fantasy stories do we need? It is already impossible to keep full tabs on what is already out there. I mean, vampires are not just mythical creatures of horror these days, they have become their own genre. Like other fields we can specialize. We can write werewolf stories, ghost stories, fairy stories, etc… I have no doubt that we can produce as many stories as we want, it’s just, when does it become too much?

 

To sum up. We have absurd numbers of books in this country, many of which have outlived their usefulness. Perhaps some effort should be made to recycle them (I’m not aware of any recycling programs for books, but if there are no such programs, perhaps there should be). Add to that the ebooks you can find on the Internet and it becomes clear that we have more stories than we actually need. Like I said, as an author, I’m not sure I emphatically believe any of this, but it was a train of thought I felt like sharing. Perhaps it is totally bogus.

 

What do you think?

No Bookstores in My Hometown: The Death of Brick-and-Mortar

This past year, the Borders bookstore closed in my hometown. It was one of a succession of bookstores that opened in our local malls, remained open for a number of years, then closed from economic pressure. The first that I recall, many years ago, was a small bookstore called “The Friar Tuck Bookshop.” I purchased my first fantasy novels there. “Friar Tuck” was followed by “Waldenbooks” (I think that’s the same company as Borders), and then “Borders.” There may have been another one or two stores in the line, but those are the ones I remember. I was kind of annoyed that Borders closed. Now all we have left is “The Cornerstone Bookshop.” It’s a decent enough shop, but it only deals in used books.

 

I guess my question is: are we seeing the end of the brick-and-mortar bookshops? I know this question was raised when Amazon first came on the scene, and despite Amazon’s success, brick-and-mortar shops have been putting up quite a fight for the last decade or so. But this past year,  Borders, which happened to be one of the retail book giants, filed for bankruptcy, and was then liquidated a short time later. It is gone, now. And this, of course, spawns the “is the brick-and-mortar bookstore doomed” question anew.

 

The problem, as I see it, is not simply the business model, but the merchandise. Hard copies of books are nice, but ebooks are cheaper, easier to carry, and easier to purchase. Why go to a bookstore to get your favorite author’s next novel, when you can just download it on the Internet from the Amazon or Barnes and Noble website? Or, if you must have a hardcopy, just order one from the Internet and wait for the mail. Add to that the growing number of free ebooks, and I really do have fears for the brick-and-mortar industry. The only convenience a large brick-and-mortar store has over an Internet website is the ease with which one can browse the titles. But I think that will change in time as well. All someone needs to do is write a program that randomly picks out titles, and you have the online version of browsing. Actually, the websites may have that functionality already. If they don’t, it’s only a matter of time. I mean, really, if I want the computer to give me a list of 10 random fantasy books, ebooks or hardcopy, how hard can it be to program. You have the genre, ten books, and I know there are random number generators for the computers. It should be relatively easy. And how about sitting down in one of those nice comfy chairs to browse through a book you are thinking of purchasing? Well, ebooks already have similar functionality allowing you to sample before you buy. The only real reason left to go to a bookstore is to socialize. And I’m a naturally shy person who rarely talks to strangers anyway. What is left?

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