I’m Going to Kill My Computer

I don’t know about anyone else, but this techno-revolution is a two-edged sword for me. I had a rough time today opening this blog. It took me five attempts or so to get my credit card information processed. Every time I hit enter, it would give me an error message and reset… I forgot one thing or another and had to start all over again. Pain in the butt. I screamed at my computer… that, of course, solved nothing, but it sure felt good. :)  Anyway, everything is up and running now. And the blog is raring to go.

I’ll begin my first blog with a brief discussion of dragons.

Dragons are my favorite mythological creature. I don’t know why. I liked dinosaurs as a kid, so maybe dragons are a natural extension of that. No fantasy world is complete without dragons. I like the traditional role they play as the near-all-powerful terrible monster looming in the background. I thought Smaug, from J.R.R. Tolkien’s the Hobbit was great–“My armor is ten-fold shields; my claws, spears, and the crack of my tail, a thunderbolt!” Love it. Can’t wait for the upcoming movie. And, for those who read the Silmarillion, there was Ancalagon the Black… I think that was his name. Another nasty one. Oh, and Tad Williams “Dragonbone Chair” had a dragon or two. Loved it.

There is a problem, of course. There is always the possibility that dragons become used too often in the fantasy literature. In addition to the stories mentioned above, there was Anne McAffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern, Weis and Hickman’s Dragonlance, and many others. Some readers might grow weary of such beasts after a few books. But I, for one, rarely get tired of them. There is just something about them. They remain, in some ways, the ultimate threat, the greatest challenge. The classic battle of a knight with naught but a sword trying to slay a creature larger than a house still reverberates with tension and meaning. It serves as a grand metaphor for struggle and challenge, something we can all relate to. And I, for one, will be sad if that particular metaphor should fade.

So, lift your ales high, sing a hearty song, and offer up to a toast to dragons… with eyes of fire, scales of steel, and breath so deadly even the Fates take pause. To dragons!

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About atoasttodragons

The author, Matthew D. Ryan, lives in northern New York on the shores of Lake Champlain, one of the largest lakes in the continental United States, famous for the Battle of Plattsburgh and the ever-elusive Lake Champlain Monster, a beastie more commonly referred to as Champy. Matthew has studied philosophy, mathematics, and computer science in the academic world. He has earned a black belt in martial arts.

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